Bikuta
Image by Bikuta

In conversation with my friend Giantess Tina, where we bandy about many far-reaching ideas, we were centering on the idea of publicity and community. I’m a writer, I have a load of stuff available for free and three titles for sale (one of which is free for July 2016), but I also want to support and promote my fellow writers.

We’re all using Twitter as a politically neutral social ground (too many haters, reputedly, at Giantess City, and Giantess Love is struggling to identify and establish itself). We writers frequently promote our work, which isn’t as eye-grabbing as a graphic artist’s sample—very difficult to hook a casual browser with a screenshot of written text, compared with an anime-ish upskirt shot—but in the interests of community, I thought I’d also promote the work of writers I admire.

I have my brace of authors who first sparked my imagination and inspired me to attempt to write out my visions. I’m sure I don’t have the first stories that I wrote, but I’ve been writing on and off for two decades, in the world of tiny men subject to playful or cruel women. And I know many of my contacts and acquaintances also have their favorite stories or writers who hit them in all the right spots. So why not start sharing titles?

Thus was #GTSFriday born. I suggested it the morning of July 22, and by the end of the day several people had pushed some of their favorite stories into visibility. If we recommended stories on Friday, that’d give us all weekend to read them, experience some new writing, and get to know the people we’re hanging out with a little better. Tina and I discussed a short story digest, what this might look like, and on my own I went with Storify to compile everyone’s votes; at Tina’s suggestion I added word count, sample text, and a few complementary images. The end result was something like a giantess-interest magazine, with direct links to the full stories.

And you can read them here. If you find me on Twitter next Friday, I hope you’ll suggest one of your own beloved stories of gigantic women and tiny men.

 

5 thoughts on “What Giantess Readers Read

  1. It’s too bad I caught the tail end of this, but It’s nice to have a link where I can see what people who participated chose. My choices might have… would have been extremely different from what I see there. I haven’t seen every choice, and it doesn’t matter that some of them would send me screaming in horror to the other side of the world. Clinically speaking, it’s interesting to see the path we each took, at least in reading. It seems to me, from unstudied observation, that the collections needed some stories with humor, or feeling. I would have added anything by Canuck, who wrote one of the best stories I’ve ever read, Moribund. Even thinking about it fills my eyes with tears. And Nemo’s works would have also gone on my list. Well, I’m sorry I missed it, but if you ever bring it back, I’ll have my choices locked, and loaded.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s one thing that cracked me up about GTSFriday. People were so concerned that their selections might not resemble the choices of other participants… I wonder if that’s part of what held people back from participating? I really tried to stress there was no judgment and I actually enjoyed the diversity of the contributions: I read many stories that I never would’ve found on my own. I hoped there were other readers like me, in that respect.

      So I think a portion of size-fetish readers are pretty self-conscious about their interest in general and their particular tastes. That’s really unfortunate, but I’ve also turned this into a lesson for myself, and that is that rather than working to seek approval, I should loudly pursue what I’m interested in. It won’t appeal to Furries, and it won’t win any Cruel fans, but maybe I’ll lure a few others like me out of the woodwork. And even if not, I’m kinda leaning heavier into the art-for-art’s-sake mindset.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Really? That’s something people actually worry about? Hmm… yeah, I get it. Now I remember how shy some people can be to admit they like a violent giantess. Some are gleefully open about it, but there will always be a bunch that will never admit it, not even anonymously. So, they are in the woodwork.

        Just not as much in the woodwork as we gentle fans are. Right. Right? sigh Who cares if there are only five of us. I still think we’re splendid people.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. There are so many funny little factors in the whole thing. For one thing, on Twitter, I think the users are predominately Cruelty-oriented, laughing about horrible things they do to Tinies. Yet if you talk to some of them, their perception is that most users are Gentle, being sweet, forming alliances, stuff like that. The grass is greener anywhere outside of a 15′ radius of wherever you’re standing, is what Twitter is.

          There are shy, ashamed consumers, sipping at a crack in the pipeline and skittering away like millipedes when they hear a noise. There are naked, pasty Tinies who throw themselves in the path of anything resembling a giantess, with SLAVE carved into their backs, because that’s all they want a giantess to want. It would be difficult to write a short story which archetypifies every type of Tiny and giantess in one long, rambling satirical piece, because one would find oneself summarily ushered from the theater and canned on one’s ass. Especially if it were true.

          So yes. We raise our little flags, send out our little hailing frequencies, and if someone else tunes in and finds us agreeable, we cleave. Pairs, triplets, small covens, splinter factions of similarly minded size-fetishists. One just has to beat one’s drum loud enough, long enough. That’s my current theory; ask me again in six months.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. That perception makes no sense, unless they are utterly unaware of the amount of responses a gentle-giantess media creator gets, when compared to the cheering roars (and whimpers) the violent-giantess ones get. Hardly any of them can be so disingenuos.

            My flag is not little.

            OK. Deal. If we’re still alive, I’ll ask you again in six months.

            Liked by 1 person

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